Conservative Prospectuses won’t cut it – Outflank Corbyn

There’s been two and a half years of non-campaigning on independence other than marches and rallies to keep spirits up.

Instead of campaigning for independence, we’ve had four SNP with milky non-confrontational anti-politics full of slogans like “Stronger For Scotland”. To which I would ask, which Scotland? And how does this strength manifest – there’s been few SNP platforms to inspire and uplift working people.

Corbyn understands little about the national question and is clearly being briefed by reactionary and independence-hostile elements in the branch office. Nevertheless, he is gaining power and popularity by articulating left solutions to social problems. Housebuilding, nationalised energy, public railways – mana from heaven for those one in four Scots who haven’t the means to save for retirement. Continue reading “Conservative Prospectuses won’t cut it – Outflank Corbyn”

EU and Independence Paper

The Scottish Socialist Party recognised that a Brexit vote under the present circumstances would unlock a “carnival of reaction” – a tidal wave of racism and little Islander mentality which would continue to blame and demean migrants and those seeking asylum for Britain’s catastrophic failures on working class people.

We also noted the revolutionary left Leave argument was strategically inept – and was nowhere near strong or organised enough to counter the brutal right’s mentality – and was one that chose to walk away against the rise of sweeping fascist parties across Europe. Continue reading “EU and Independence Paper”

Two years on – and the economics of campaigning

Saturday, I went to Stirling. Later in the evening, the Stirling Branch comrades had a curry night, to raise cash for the branch. We ended up with a shade under a hundred quid – which was by no means bad.

sunday_timesThe same night, there was a “supporters of the union” fundraiser – which raised around £300,000. It was attended largely by the filthy rich, and reported in the Sunday Times.

One of the big prizes was – “A fabulous chalet and a family home, with six bedrooms sleeping 12, all en suite. Although the chalet does not come with a chalet girl, we will provide one for you.” Continue reading “Two years on – and the economics of campaigning”

The European Question

It’s not been an easy choice. The Leave and Remain campaigns have been absolutely bereft of anything positive to say about the future of the nation either way.

I’m for Remain. But just barely – I do not endorse the EU as it is manifested. It’s nowhere near democratic enough. more weight could be placed on the power of directly-elected representatives in the parliament than the indirectly-elected ones in the Commission, for example. Continue reading “The European Question”

A year in review – Part 2 – April

I’m mostly going to be writing this as stream of consciousness – as I recall it happening, and my thoughts around the time.

Straight into April!

None of the April Fools were funny. The Scottish Greens came closest – A sneaky wee press-release on their website, entitled. “Independence is our opportunity to protect outer space.” They clearly had spies in Philip Hammond’s office from his announcement later in the year. Continue reading “A year in review – Part 2 – April”

Getting pro-independence candidates elected in 2016

We’ve seen some remarkable polling in the past couple of days. As the referendum fallout continues, the British Labour Party’s Scotland branch disintegrates, divides and is (presently) leaderless.

As they reunite, it’s clear that there’s an opportunity to deliver as many pro-independence candidates to Holyrood in 2016 as possible. To do so, requires a bit of psephological analysis – and a strategy for gaming the Additional Member System to deliver as many Yes candidates as possible. Continue reading “Getting pro-independence candidates elected in 2016”

A draft letter to Leithers

People of Leith: be proud. You registered to vote in droves, you engaged, debated, argued the future, faced down scaremongering, fear and already-unravelling lies to return a Yes result across Leith and Leith Walk polling districts.

It wasn’t enough. The people of Scotland said No: 55% to 45%. So, let’s take a look at what’s coming. Continue reading “A draft letter to Leithers”